Parents for Pedro: Why Parents in San Antonio ISD Should Support Superintendent Pedro Martinez

The headlines coming out of San Antonio ISD lately have been alarming: “Teacher Layoffs,” “Making Cuts to Teaching Staff,” and more. Superintendent Pedro Martinez is facing strong criticism. But I want to assure families and people who care about the long-term success of San Antonio ISD that this difficult passage is a necessary step along the way to a brighter future for the district. It takes courageous leadership to make tough decisions. Parents in San Antonio ISD should be showing their support for Superintendent Martinez and the board so the overall positive trend can continue.

San Antonio ISD is in the process of becoming a 21st century school system. This transformation involves a set of changes that will help students find best-fit schools and will make sure that low-income families have access to high quality schools, too. In the past few years, as new schools of choice have opened, families have already started to see the benefits.

San Antonio ISD Is Becoming a System of Great Schools

Pedro Martinez joined San Antonio ISD as Superintendent in 2015. He announced a set of five-year goals and a plan for getting there, called Blueprint for Excellent: Target 2020. Martinez presented the most recent iteration of the plan at the State of the District 2018. The most visible changes have been in the areas of new in-district charter schools, district-charter partnerships, and lab schools.

San Antonio ISD Superintendent Pedro Martinez at the 2018 State of the District address | San Antonio Charter Moms

The first big change that I noticed was an explosion of new schools of choice within San Antonio ISD. The San Antonio Charter Moms discussion group has been buzzing with questions about these new school models and how to apply. Here are some examples of new in-district charter schools in San Antonio ISD that parents are excited about:

  • Advanced Learning Academy (opened 2016) lets students collaborate and dive deep into projects; a great place for students who need to stretch beyond what’s typical for their grade level.
  • Steele Montessori Academy (opened 2017) is the only public Montessori school in the San Antonio area.
  • Twain Dual Language Academy (opened 2017) offers dual language education in English and Spanish. Native English speakers and native Spanish speakers learn side-by-side and get the cognitive benefits of being bilingual. This model will be expanded to Irving Dual Language Academy in 2018.

Twain Dual Language Academy students reciting the Pledge of Allegiance at the San Antonio ISD State of the District address | San Antonio Charter Moms

District-charter partnerships are a way to bring expertise from successful charter school operators into the San Antonio ISD community. Here are examples of district-charter partnerships in San Antonio ISD:

[Hall Monitor] Texans Can Academies at Highlands High School: Another Charter Operator to Set Up Shop in San Antonio ISD | San Antonio Charter Moms

Lab schools are campuses that host teacher-training programs. They have a dual purpose of offering high-quality education to current students and developing great teachers and school leaders for the future. Here are examples of lab schools within San Antonio ISD:

These new programs—schools of choice, district-charter partnerships, and lab schools—are moving San Antonio ISD in the direction of meeting the 2020 goals.

Classroom at Ogden Elementary, a lab school in San Antonio ISD in partnership with the Relay Graduate School of Education | San Antonio Charter Moms

Temporary Reduction in Force; Long-Term Vision for Talent Management

The 2016 Blueprint for Excellence highlighted five Pillars of Success, including Talent Management, which is defined as the process of “creat[ing] an innovative learning culture for SAISD by attracting, recruiting, and retaining top instructional and leadership talent,” in the words of Deputy Superintendent Matthew Weber.

The Blueprint document outlined talent management strategies like leadership pathways, teaching residency programs, and laboratory schools. The overall message is that the school district’s culture is changing:

Our ambitious plans for talent management, and all other components of this blueprint, hinge
on our ability to build a systemic culture of high expectations and consistent accountability, for
students and for staff. Shifting culture is an on-going process that will take years to achieve,
but we are all in. Our rigorous 5-year goals for academic excellence throughout SAISD are a
testament to our commitment.

In 2018, San Antonio ISD is in a tough situation. Student enrollment is still falling, and there is a significant budget gap. As Texas Public Radio explained:

District officials said the cuts are necessary because it’s expecting $31 million less in state revenue next school year. The district budgeted for a slight increase this school year, but instead saw its greatest drop in recent memory: a loss of more than 2,000 students. Next year, it expects to lose about 800 more students for a total enrollment of 49,969.

Falling enrollment and the resulting budget shortfall has made it necessary for the district to lay off teachers and cut central office staff. The teachers’ union, the San Antonio Alliance of Teachers and Support Personnel, is campaigning on social media (and elsewhere) against the layoffs. This controversy is heating up in preparation for the May 14 board meeting, when the board will vote on the list of teachers who were asked to resign but declined to do so.

The current reduction in force is a painful but necessary step for San Antonio ISD to act in a financially responsible way during a period of declining student enrollment. The vision of the Talent Management pillar, as part of the overall blueprint for a system of great schools, is optimistic: building a community of great teachers and school leaders who want to educate and lift up every student, including the ones from underserved backgrounds who have traditionally been left behind.

Hallway at Ogden Elementary, a lab school in San Antonio ISD in partnership with the Relay Graduate School of Education | San Antonio Charter Moms

San Antonio ISD Parents Support Superintendent Pedro Martinez

San Antonio ISD parents need to speak up and show their support for Superintendent Martinez. Under his leadership, San Antonio ISD is already becoming a system of great schools, with many new schools of choice that offer unique models that appeal to parents, and are designed to integrate students of many different backgrounds.

As I said in my March 19 op-ed in the San Antonio Express-News, the Superintendent and the board of trustees are acting courageously and making tough decisions. I’m sure it’s not easy for district staff to ask a group of teachers to resign, or for board members to vote to terminate contracts. It’s important not to let this difficult period distract from the overall trend of improvement in the district.

San Antonio ISD is going through a period of dramatic change. These improvements are already benefitting students and families through new schools of choice, offering a range of options so that families can find the best-fit schools for their children.

Now is the time for parents to speak up and let Martinez and the board know that we appreciate the changes that the district has made already, and we want the improvements to continue under Martinez’s leadership. I encourage you to use your personal social media accounts to spread that message (look for posts tagged #ParentsforPedro) and to attend the May 14 board meeting. Looking for more guidance or inspiration? Ask to join the San Antonio Charter Moms discussion group.

Library at Ogden Elementary, a lab school in San Antonio ISD in partnership with the Relay Graduate School of Education | San Antonio Charter Moms

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sachartermoms

Parent-activist and education blogger in San Antonio, Texas, USA. Helping parents make informed school choices and explore cultural activities.

4 Comments

  1. I have three boys who attend the ALA in SAISD. This school would not have been possible without the support of Pedro Martinez. I grew up in SAISD and the schools I was zoned to were so poor and did such a terrible job educating children I was never able to attend them. I am grateful for the changes I see in SAISD.

  2. From my humble opinion, you and your SA moms sound like you are for gentrification. The schools, in their present state do not have the look or feel you want to be accustomed to. You are a lawyer and not a sociologist to have the sheer understanding of why schools are in the state they are in. I am and also a teacher. I’m on the front lines. You and Robert Rivard were more than welcome to visit my school. How can you define high quality education from Great Hearts? If you are allowed to chose who attends your school of course you can affect your outcomes.

  3. Where are you getting this information? Some of the partnerships you mentioned were around way before Pedro and will be around way after he’s gone! It strikes me as odd that someone who has no ties to the district thinks they know what’s best for us. Leave our public schools to us: the people with a vested interest. The people who are products of the district, who are residents of the district, and employees of the district.

  4. An “in district charter school” is not the same as letting a charter take over a school. In district charter schools started before Pedro. He is not the reason for their success.

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